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The Lipstick Page Forums Fashion Blog
Pearl bracelet


Posted by Colleen Shirazi, Wednesday, January 24, 2007 9:01 PM (Eastern)







Okay, I'm done with this piece.

If anything, I've learned a lot about the finer details of construction this month. It's relatively easy to make the piece itself. But after you've worn it for a while, you start to appreciate those hundreds of little touches, that were invisible to you before, that make it a piece that either breaks down after a while, or else lasts.

That is a hot topic over at the jewelrymaking.about.com forum. Of all the about.com sections I've visited, I'll have to say this is one of the best. It's constantly being updated, and has all sorts of tutorials and links.

So...in the previous incarnation of this bracelet, for example, the pearls were connected directly to the clasp. Not good; it's a terrific wear-and-tear spot. Solution: use not one, but two jump rings to connect pearl to clasp. In fact two jump rings can work in many stress points.

While I was doing this, I discovered a better way to snip the jump rings (you can and should use a saw for this but I don't have one). Simply hold the coil horizontally to make the cuts. Comes out straight every time.

Why a blue stone? It's a beautiful clasp, but I bought it for a turquoise piece, not this. But I tried it...it's just too perfect. The blue stone in real life is sky blue in color...it's Swiss Blue Topaz, not Sky Blue, but it's not that almost gaudy blue that you see in blue topaz. It's like the California sky on a good day.

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